PRINCELING

Ryoji Ikeda :: superposition

superposition is a project about the way we understand the reality of nature on an atomic scale and is inspired by the mathematical notions of quantum mechanics. Performers will appear in his piece for the first time, performing as operator/conductor/observer/examiners. All the components on stage will be in a state of superposition; sound, visuals, physical phenomena, mathematical concepts, human behaviour and randomness - these will be constantly orchestrated and de-orchestrated simultaneously in a single performance piece.

PRINCELING

Lucid title sequence, WIP?

Screenshot of 4D Lucid animation I’m working on — aperture set high on my After Effects camera created this great distortion in the earlier frames.

Screenshot of 4D Lucid animation I’m working on — aperture set high on my After Effects camera created this great distortion in the earlier frames.

Final Dissertation Proposal

“Products or goods are produced not to be consumed, to be swallowed directly, but as a set of new modes of communication, knowledge, languages, or even worlds.”

—   Chukhrov, “The Space of the General: On Labor Beyond Materiality and Immateriality” 

As my practice fundamentally revolves around the creation of a personalised universe or what I call the fabrication of the Contemporary Mythology/Fantasy, I think it would be interesting to consider constructing my dissertation almost like an art object in itself: printed on vellum or some kind of semi-transparent acetate, perhaps, with a couple of layers of either mirrored sheets or a form of lenticular printing (holographic illusion). So that the reader has the possibility of literally reading the dissertation from a distorted, glitching perspective. Language is another filter - and what I am interested in is the fabrication of the filter… of the filter… of the filter.

My first essay was about the Object consuming the Subject; my second essay saw the Subject become the Object; my third essay was about the Object being consumed within the cocoon of the Context-Object, or the frame, the uncanny space, the personalised world. What is necessary now is to put all the essays, which are related sequentially to each other, together in a coherent way where the writing itself is (like Bataille) stylistically linked. The Subject, Object and Context-Object merge, flattening the 3D into 2D layers. The ecosystem of creative remediation mediates the self back to itself: the object back to the subject-object. Seen from a certain perspective, these sandwiched 2D layers construct a 4D illusion or uncanny space that merges the virtual and the real into a singular entity. No longer do we ask what is real, only what is meaningful.

The Dissertation is the Context-Object (cocoon) from which meaning emerges. But is the essay about the context-object or is it the context-object? If it is the latter, then should it be constructed like a scientific, anthropological study of a new being/context/world that has the pulsing qualities of a GIF, the capricious unpredictability of a meme, the dark secrets of the Deep Web? The ultimate Post-Internet Creature, the Post-Machine Machine, the Un-topia? Or should it simply discuss it from the distant perspective of an Observer?

If we imagine that we exist in a 4D illusion (a hologram), then wonder makes sense. Spectacle is logical, absolutely necessary and simultaneously self-aware of its own falseness. It makes sense, also, that in the face of illusion we crave sincerity, meaning and integrity. Look to movements like the New Sincerity, nu-Muzac/lounge/New Wave genres like seapunk, chillwave and vaporwave, or recent exhibitions like Lone Tree at Marlborough Chelsea which observes that they have “seen lately a significant resurrection of Romanticism in contemporary art […] explore how notions of the spiritual and the magical alongside the sublime and the romantic, have once again, become important” and The New Romantics at Eyebeam which explores “ways in which contemporary artists using digital media engage the body, representations of nature, poetic irony, and expressions of individuality as originally expressed in 19th century Romanticism […] The artists in this exhibition expose an underlying thread of individual expression that extends beyond mere tech-fetishism.” As the Metamodernist manifesto observes, we are oscillating, bringing back nostalgia, sincerity, magic and illusion. Except perhaps now it is the illusion of disappearance, of a curious geometric flattening towards the horizon, towards banality, the glitch-kitsch, as a strategy for new meaning.

However my dissertation is structured, I would like to reference these exhibitions and new media artists like Mark Leckey, Jon Rafman, Joe Hamilton, Yoshihide Sodeoka, Adam Ferris etc, many of who touch upon Ian Bogost and Graham Harman’s definition of object oriented ontology (becoming object). Also online curation, labels and memes, including musicians like Oneohtrix Point Never, PC Music, Vektroid, etc. As a whole, the essay must remain critical and self-aware, referencing many contemporary cultural elements of post-internet life but not submitting to it. TLDR; above all the essay’s key point is to remain true to itself and attempt to dig/accelerate towards describing and proposing the new cultural strategy of the second decade of the millennium.

Banality as a medium, imitation and reproduction as a site for revolution, excavating a virtual geo-location where everything is not alike but similar

What comes out as 4D? Is it the subject, the object or the context-object? Or is it a sleekly transformative creature, glistening wet as it emerges from the husk, the ghost emerging from the shell? It is not utterly human or machine or even necessarily cyborg… its parts, made anew, are organic, having not been post-fabricated but constructed from our electric dreams, the accelerated devotion, belief and investment towards the Contemporary Fantasy.

PRINCELING

Becoming Harmonious, Glitch Mob — Susi Sie

Against a canvas of malleable matter, sound waves create clear patterns of vibrations, revealing the beautiful, symmetrical designs at the bottom of everything. First demonstrated in the late 18th Century by German physicist Ernst Chladni, these otherwise invisible properties reap the benefits of our nascent new millennium: under a 100mm macro lens, these minute movements are captured in stunning detail.

For Glitch Mob's new video “Becoming Harmonious,” director Susi Sie uses the same methods that revealed this micro-motion, but gets way closer in on the action. Capturing the results of a subwoofer stacked against water, Sie’s video begins with frequencies that create fluid geometric patterns that closely following the song’s gradual buildup. As the track progresses, increasingly defined shapes appear, and by the time the bass drops, it’s a full-on aqua dance party. Water goes wild to the sounds of the Glitch Mob, resulting in wild, fluctuating elliptical patterns. 

The New Romantics [ II ], Eyebeam, NY
17 Apr - 10 May 2014

Artists Included: Mark Beasley, Tim Berresheim, Alexandra Gorczynski, Ryan Whittier Hale, Claudia Hart, Jeremiah Johnson, Brookhart Jonquil, Sophie Kahn, Alex M. Lee, Sara Ludy, Shane Mecklenburger, Jonathan Monaghan, Mikey McParlane and Michael Mallis, Brenna Murphy, Nicholas O’Brien, Jaakko Pallasvuo, Jon Rafman, Nicolas Sassoon, Jasper Spicero, Kate Steciw, Katie Torn, and Krist Wood.

The New Romantics, Eyebeam, NY
17 Apr - 10 May 2014

The New Romantics is an exhibition exploring the ways in which contemporary artists using digital media engage the body, representations of nature, poetic irony, and expressions of individuality as originally expressed in 19th Century Romanticism. By drawing equivalences between then and now, this exhibition identifies a critical precedent for artists today that are responding to their ever changing technological environment. Just as the Romantics responded to the industrial revolution, this group of artists are similarly responding to the current information revolution.

Curators Claudia Hart, Nicholas O’Brien, and Katie Torn have put together an exhibition that illustrates the diversity and complexity of contemporary digital production. In doing so, The New Romantics presents a unique selection of works by artists not based on formal similarities, but on expressive affinities. By employing a myriad of contemporary techniques - including digital fabrication, 3D simulation, software-based collage, video game engines, and peer to peer networking tools - the artists in this exhibition expose an underlying thread of individual expression that extends beyond mere tech-fetishism.

Lone Tree, Marlborough Chelsea
Apr 4 - May 3, 2014

"The artist’s feeling is his law. Genuine feeling can never be contrary to nature; it is always in harmony with her. But another person’s feelings should never be imposed on us as law. Spiritual affinity leads to similarity in work, but such affinity is something entirely different from mimicry." — C.D. Friedrich

We have seen lately a significant resurrection of Romanticism in contemporary art. […] This exhibition is a starting point from which to explore how notions of the spiritual and the magical alongside the sublime and the romantic, have once again, become important as contemporary artists grapple with the rapid developments that are changing the world as we know it, right before our eyes.

Artists: Bas Jan Ader, Darren Almond, David Altmejd, Lucas Arruda, Dan Colen, Jay Defeo, Roe Ethridge, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Andreas Gursky, Karl Haendel, Anselm Kiefer, Friedrich Kunath, Robert Longo, Paul Pfeiffer, Ed Ruscha, Tomas Sanchez, Guido Van Der Werve

My Education: A Portrait of David Hillard, Adam PendletonPace Gallery, NYUntil May 03, 2014
I was in this gallery for a total of about 30 seconds so I know nothing about this work, it looks cool thoHere is some info I snatched out of the intern’s handsI should really stop writing these descriptions at 4AM:

The subject of this work, David Hillard, is a lecturer, educator, and founding member and former Chief of Staff of the Black Panther Party. Pendleton films Hillard as he takes the viewer through the Oakland neighbourhoods that were home to the Black Panther movement, from the lots, houses and storefronts where the Black Panther set up free meal programs for the area’s youth to the site of a fatal gun battle that took place on April 6, 1968, two days after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. That day, in a confrontation between Oakland police and members of the Black Panthers, two policemen were seriously wounded, as were others on both sides of the battle, and Black Panther treasurer Bobby Hutton was fatally shot. Recorded history states that the Panthers initiated the firefight through am ambush. Hillard, who was present at the time, states that the Panthers were followed and surrounded by police, who initiated the fight. […] The film raises questions and invites discussion about a fraught moment in American history that continues to ripple through society.

My Education: A Portrait of David Hillard, Adam Pendleton
Pace Gallery, NY
Until May 03, 2014

I was in this gallery for a total of about 30 seconds so I know nothing about this work, it looks cool tho
Here is some info I snatched out of the intern’s hands
I should really stop writing these descriptions at 4AM:

The subject of this work, David Hillard, is a lecturer, educator, and founding member and former Chief of Staff of the Black Panther Party. Pendleton films Hillard as he takes the viewer through the Oakland neighbourhoods that were home to the Black Panther movement, from the lots, houses and storefronts where the Black Panther set up free meal programs for the area’s youth to the site of a fatal gun battle that took place on April 6, 1968, two days after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. That day, in a confrontation between Oakland police and members of the Black Panthers, two policemen were seriously wounded, as were others on both sides of the battle, and Black Panther treasurer Bobby Hutton was fatally shot. Recorded history states that the Panthers initiated the firefight through am ambush. Hillard, who was present at the time, states that the Panthers were followed and surrounded by police, who initiated the fight. […] The film raises questions and invites discussion about a fraught moment in American history that continues to ripple through society.

Fun with Bioplastics

My journey into the world of bioplastics has been a mad experience through an alien landscape. I went to the grocery store and I got me some cornstarch, thermometer, food colouring (ALL COLOURS BECAUSE I’M ~*PRIMARY*~), milk, vinegar… and went to the local pharmacy to get me some glycerin.

Here are some websites I was looking at: Instructables & Make Your Own Bioplastics by Greenplasticsnet

I still haven’t had time to do casein (milk) bioplastic yet so I decided to stick to corn for now. I’m really interested in chitin, algae, tapioca, potato, gelatine, sunflower seed, soya bean proteins, yam, banana skin, etc or more or even combining different polymers with fibres like flax and hemp. Bioplastics Party, anyone…?

bioplastic3do you take sugar with your bioplastic

bioplastic2I am an art student and my food colouring is very artistic 

CORNSTARCH BIOPLASTICS:

bioplastic16my science lab

Experiment 1: using the Instructables base ingredients and recipe.

  1. 1/2 cup cornstarch
  2. 1/2 cup water
  3. 1 tsp canola oil
  4. 3 drops of blue food colouring

Experiment 2: using Instructables base ingredients and recipe but adding MORE water to make more pliable.

  1. 1/2 cup cornstarch
  2. 1 cup water
  3. 1 teaspoon canola oil
  4. 3 drops yellow food colouring

bioplastic14~*#GRADIENTS*~

+ HEART: I had some extra left of experiment 2 after I poured the mixture into the aluminium foil cupcake moulds so I decided to add a drop of blue food colouring to a single heart-shaped mould and let it mix by itself with the yellow mixture.

Then I reached a plateau because I was like, wait.. I don’t have a microwave. I considered this for a bit and then decided to just bake my mixture for an undetermined amount of time. It was 1:09 PM. I baked the mixture (all of the above together) until 1:25, a total of 16 minutes. Then I took it out and let it cool down.

bioplastic11bioplastic13bioplastic10This is what I do in my spare time. Much art very wow

Experiment 3: Using Greenplasticsnet’s recipe and ingredients

bioplastic5Random unrelated thought: is cheese a bioplastic?

  1. 1 tbsp cornstarch
  2. 4 tbsp water
  3. 1 tsp glycerin
  4. 2 drops of yellow food colouring

bioplastic6Please don’t ask me why

This recipe asked for the mixture to be heated on the stove. However, it did not specify what temperature, how long, when I should start the heat so I mixed all of the ingredients before turning on the heat and continuing to stir until it looked kind of kneadable and jelly-like. I tried with no food colouring and then a second batch WITH food colouring (red and yellow). I guess the second batch turned out slightly more malleable and clay-like probably because I still had remnants of the first batch at the bottom of the pot (…because I was lazy…)

bioplastic7Guess the Biofruit

bioplastic8I tried

Shitty Observations

  • Oven-baked cornstarch bioplastic is a lot more gelatin/jelly-like than the stove-cooked bioplastic. The latter is a lot more malleable like hot, soft clay when fresh.
  • Both CRACK and shrivel (shrink) when dried. This is problematic… I need to figure out how best to tackle this problem. Would refrigerating help? What about pouring resin over it before it dries?
  • I’ve read that the pliability of the bioplastic depends not only on how much cornstarch/water you put in but also the amount of glycerin. If you put in a lot of glycerin, there is the likelihood that the plastic will never dry, which is interesting.
  • How to stop the bioplastic from biodegrading as much as possible even if it endures heat (for example, an LED light…?)
  • The corners of the oven-baked bioplastic are interesting; they’re translucent/transparent and very plastic like.
  • I’m not sure the canola oil helped with anything except to form these interesting oil spot textures on the surface of the oven-baked bioplastic.

bioplastic17Cheese platter?

And that’s the end of this episode of Fun with Bioplastics. Tune in next time for further kid’s serious lab experiments.